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A leatherback released by a collaboration of fishermen, scientists, and government officials in Sinaloa, México
A leatherback released by a collaboration of fishermen, scientists, and government officials in Sinaloa, México
Laúd OPO workshop connects members across the region
Laúd OPO workshop connects members across the region
Laúd OPO network extends regional bycatch assessment
Laúd OPO network extends regional bycatch assessment
Happy Pacific Leatherback Day! Leatherback nesting season has begun!
Happy Pacific Leatherback Day! Leatherback nesting season has begun!
Training Workshops on Best Practices for Management of Incidentally Captured Sea Turtles in Colombia and Panama
Training Workshops on Best Practices for Management of Incidentally Captured Sea Turtles in Colombia and Panama
Enrique Laúd, the story of a leatherback male rescued in Sinaloa, México.
Enrique Laúd, the story of a leatherback male rescued in Sinaloa, México.

WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE

We are a group united by a common goal: recovering the leatherback turtle population (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The Eastern Pacific Leatherback Turtle Conservation Network (Laúd OPO) has members from all over the Americas, from the United States to Chile. Many of these people are scientists, local people, fishermen, and organizations who work towards sea turtle conservation, especially leatherback turtles, along with coastal communities in their own countries.

ABOUT US

OUR PARTNERS

Our partners come from all over the world and across industries. We work with NGOs, government agencies, researchers, and the private sector. Interested in joining us?

THE NETWORK

The Laúd OPO Network was established in 2015, but has roots back to 2012 when more than thirty regional and international leatherback sea turtle biologists, researchers, NGOs, and experts came together to develop a plan to stabilize and recover East Pacific leatherback turtle populations within ten years. Today, the Network includes over 70 members.

THE ACTION PLAN

In 2012, more than thirty regional and international experts came together to develop a plan to stabilize and recover East Pacific leatherback turtle populations within ten years. The plan establishes realistic but ambitious population goals, defines key activities to address major threats to East Pacific leatherbacks, and outlines specific actions, metrics, timelines and financial needs to ensure success.

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